“Even if I’m far away, I can make my message heard.”

Indigenous Yanesha women from the Palcazú valley. Photo: UNDP Peru/Monica Suárez Galindo
UNDP, the Peruvian Ministry of Culture, and the Confederation of Amazonian Nationalities of Peru (CONAP) have created “Respira Amazonía” (Amazon’s Breath), a series of 50 short radio messages in indigenous languages. Photo: UNDP Peru/Monica Suárez Galindo
Edson, 32, on the left, is the only registered Kakataibo translator in the Ministry of Culture. Photo: UNDP Peru
Of the 47 different indigenous languages spoken in Peru, 44 are in the Amazon. Photo: UNDP Peru
“All the communities in the Amazon and the Andes feel safe and at home when we speak to each other in our own language. We feel represented, we feel happy,” says Valbina Miguel Toribio, from the Yanesha community.
Written in the indigenous Yanesha language, “Coronavirus is very dangerous, but we can stop its spread within our community.” According to the Ministry of Culture, only 1,142 people speak Yanesha in the entire country. Photo: UNDP Peru/Monica Suárez Galindo

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