Six years after Sinjar massacre, support is vital for returning Yazidis

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Return to Sinjar has been slow since the officially declared cessation of the ISIL conflict in 2017, largely due to the level of destruction wrought in 2014. In addition to the human catastrophe, ISIL destroyed up to 80 per cent of public infrastructure and 70 per cent of civilian homes in Sinjar City and surrounding areas. © IOM Iraq / Raber Y. Aziz
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Six years on, up to 200,000 Yazidis are still displaced. Some are still facing harsh conditions on Mount Sinjar, where they fled to escape.
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Jalal Khalaf Piso and his family fled to the Kurdistan Region after ISIL entered Sinjar. The family lived in unfinished buildings in Duhok until Sinjar was liberated in 2015.
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A mobile substation was installed in the Sinjar District with the support of UNDP’s Funding Facility for Stabilization (FFS).
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IOM provides mental health and psychosocial services, legal services related to housing, land and property, and support to civil society organizations working on peacebuilding initiatives. Protection services are provided in Sardashti camp, where many Yazidis remain displaced. © IOM Iraq / Raber Y. Aziz
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Sinjar Primary Healthcare Centre was rehabilitated with the support of UNDP’s Funding Facility for Stabilization (FFS).
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The view from the rehabilitated Sinjar Primary Healthcare Centre. UNDP’s support to returnees extends across a number of critical sectors including health, education, water, and electricity.

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